STUDIES WEEKLY
http://www.studiesweekly.com/online/

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER

Week 1 - World/U.S. Geography
Students will use a map to identify physical features of the U.S. They will discuss cartography and learn about Alexander von Humboldt.
· Picture the Earth!
· Help a Rat and Learn to Run the Country This Year!
· Geography and Maps
· Perseverance: Abby Sunderland
· Cartography
· How has navigating the world changed throughout history?
· Alexander von Humboldt (1769 - 1859)

Week 2 - U.S. States and Regions
Students will learn about the natural regions of the United States. They will discuss physical features such as mountains, plains and plateaus.
· Mapping the News
· USA's Seven Natural Regions SS4G1a
Locate major physical features of the United States; include the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Great Plains, the Continental Divide, the Great Basin, Death Valley, the Gulf of Mexico, the St. Lawrence River, and the Great Lakes.
· Diversity
· Which is the most important river in America?
· Caravel
· Two More Stars on the Flag! SS4G1a
Locate major physical features of the United States; include the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Great Plains, the Continental Divide, the Great Basin, Death Valley, the Gulf of Mexico, the St. Lawrence River, and the Great Lakes.
· Click... Travel... and Learn!

Week 3 - American Indian Nations
Students will discuss ancient civilizations/ historic tribes and compare cultural aspects by region.
· The Case of the Disappearing Anasazi SS4H1a
Locate where Native Americans settled with emphasis on the Arctic (Inuit), Northwest (Kwakiutl), Plateau (Nez Perce), Southwest (Hopi), Plains (Pawnee), and Southeast (Seminole).
, SS4G2a
Explain why each of the Native American groups (SS4H1a) occupied the areas they did, with emphasis on why some developed permanent villages and others did not.
· American Indians SS4H1a
Locate where Native Americans settled with emphasis on the Arctic (Inuit), Northwest (Kwakiutl), Plateau (Nez Perce), Southwest (Hopi), Plains (Pawnee), and Southeast (Seminole).
, SS4H1b
Describe how Native Americans used their environment to obtain food, clothing, and shelter.
, SS4G2a
Explain why each of the Native American groups (SS4H1a) occupied the areas they did, with emphasis on why some developed permanent villages and others did not.
· Southeast
· What's in a Name? SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· Rumination and Contemplation: Bacon's Rebellion SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.

Week 4 - How Did It All Begin?
Students will examine and understand the causes and effects of European colonization in the United States beginning in 1565.
· How it all Began in the 'New World' SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
· Is Christopher Columbus a hero or a villain?
· The Age of Discovery SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
· Mapping the Age of Discovery
· Worth Their Weight in Gold
· Clarity of Expression: Henry Hudson SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
, SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.

Week 5 - Spanish and Portuguese Explorers
Students will discover the process of exploration by focusing on motives and accomplishments of early Spanish and Portuguese explorers.
· It's Not the End of the World SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
· Make No Bones About This
· Early Explorers SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
, SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.
· Vasco da Gama (1460s - 1524): No Simple Feat SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
· Which do you think will be the best place for scientists to explore during your lifetime, the oceans or outer space?
· Mel and his Mother Lode

Week 6 - English and French Explorers
Students will discover the process of exploration by focusing on motives and accomplishments of early French and English explorers.
· Drake the Savage Sea Dog
· A Neanderthal's Best Friend
· Early French and English Explorers: Who Went Where, When and How SS4H2a
Describe the reasons for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, and English explorations of John Cabot, Vasco Núñez de Balboa, Juan Ponce de León, Christopher Columbus, Henry Hudson, and Jacques Cartier.
, SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.
· Is Today Tomorrow?
· Cajuns, Carnivals, and Capuchons
· What invention do you think has benefited people most?
· Amazing Invention of the 13th Century - The Compass!
· Champ, the Lake Champlain Monster

Week 7 - Dividing the New World
Students will know some benefits of interaction among American Indians, explorers and colonists and will discuss the Columbian Exchange.
· The Three L's of Power - Dividing the New World SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
, SS4E1a
Describe opportunity costs and their relationship to decision-making across time (such as decisions to send expeditions to North and South America).
· The Old World Meets the New World SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
, SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
, SS4G2c
Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities practiced therein.
, SS4E1b
Explain how price incentives affect people’s behavior and choices (such as colonial decisions about what crops to grow and products to produce).
, SS4E1c
Describe how specialization improves standards of living (such as the differences in the economies in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies).
, SS4E1d
Explain how voluntary exchange helps both buyers and sellers (such as prehistoric and colonial trade in North America).
, SS4E1e
Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as how trade between the colonies and England affected their economies).
, SS4E1f
Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States (such as the steamboat, the steam locomotive, and the telegraph).
· Please Pass the Chocolate
· If you were in charge of starting a city...
· Connecting the World
· I NA SS4G1b
Locate major man-made features; include New York City, NY; Boston, MA; Philadelphia, PA; and the Erie Canal.
· The Beat of Your Heart
· Think and Review



OCTOBER-DECEMBER


Week 8 - Early English Colonies
Students will study early English colonies— Roanoke, Jamestown and Plymouth.
· The Lost Colony of Roanoke
· Jamestown, an Unsettling Settlement SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
, SS4H3a
Compare and contrast life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies.
, SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
· Plymouth Colony, a Thankful Place SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
· Should Thanksgiving be a national holiday?
· John White - a Man of Many Talents (c. 1540-1593)

Week 9 - New England Colonies
Students will study colonies in New England— Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire.
· Puritans on Parade
· The New England Colonies SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
, SS4H3a
Compare and contrast life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies.
, SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
, SS4G2c
Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities practiced therein.
, SS4E1c
Describe how specialization improves standards of living (such as the differences in the economies in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies).
· Going 'Old School' SS4G1b
Locate major man-made features; include New York City, NY; Boston, MA; Philadelphia, PA; and the Erie Canal.
· Robert Frost, Famous American Poet (1874-1963)
· Hungry? Ask a Robot!

Week 10 - Middle Colonies
Students will study the Middle Colonies—New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware.
· Benjamin Franklin, the 'First American' (1706-1790) SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· The Middle Colonies SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
, SS4H3a
Compare and contrast life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies.
, SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
, SS4G2c
Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities practiced therein.
, SS4CG1b
“We the people” from the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution as a reflection of consent of the governed or popular sovereignty.
, SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
, SS4E1c
Describe how specialization improves standards of living (such as the differences in the economies in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies).
· Reason and Logic: The First Filipino Settlement in America
· The Amish SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· The Flower Hunter - William Bartram (1739-1823)

Week 11 - Southern Colonies
Students will study the Southern Colonies— Georgia, Virginia, Maryland and the Carolinas.
· The Real Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia
· The Southern Colonies SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
, SS4H3a
Compare and contrast life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies.
, SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
, SS4G2c
Explain how the physical geography of the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies helped determine economic activities practiced therein.
, SS4E1c
Describe how specialization improves standards of living (such as the differences in the economies in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies).
, SS4E1d
Explain how voluntary exchange helps both buyers and sellers (such as prehistoric and colonial trade in North America).
, SS4E1e
Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as how trade between the colonies and England affected their economies).
· Sericulture: Are You Serious?
· What do you think about colonial people having indentured servants?
· The Colonial Craft of Quillery: Paper Pictures

Week 12 - Slavery in the Colonies
Students will discuss Triangular Trade and slavery in the colonies.
· Cotton-Pickin' Singing
· The Amistad
· Slavery in the Colonies SS4H3a
Compare and contrast life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies.
, SS4H3b
Describe colonial life in America as experienced by various people, including large landowners, farmers, artisans, women, indentured servants, slaves, and Native Americans.
, SS4E1e
Describe how trade promotes economic activity (such as how trade between the colonies and England affected their economies).
· Fort Mose
· Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806)
· What is Juneteenth
· Slavery and the Law SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.
, SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).

Week 13 - Mounting Tensions
Students will study events that led up to the American Revolution.
· A Party in the Harbor
· A Census Full of Treasure
· Mounting Tensions in the Colonies SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
, SS4H4a
Trace the events that shaped the revolutionary movement in America, including the French and Indian War, British Imperial Policy that led to the 1765 Stamp Act, the slogan “no taxation without representation,” the activities of the Sons of Liberty, and the Boston Tea Party.
, SS4H4d
Describe key individuals in the American Revolution with emphasis on King George III, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Benedict Arnold, Patrick Henry, and John Adams.
· A Patriotic Pair of Founding Fathers SS4H4d
Describe key individuals in the American Revolution with emphasis on King George III, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Benedict Arnold, Patrick Henry, and John Adams.
· Massacre or mistake? You be the judge

Week 14 - Declaring Independence
Students will discuss some important events of 1775 and the writing/signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.
· Declaring Independence SS4CG1a
Natural rights as found in the Declaration of Independence (the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness).
· Making the World a Kinder Place
· The Road to Independence SS4H4b
Explain the writing of the Declaration of Independence; include who wrote it, how it was written, why it was necessary, and how it was a response to tyranny and the abuse of power.
, SS4H4c
Describe the major events of the American Revolution and explain the factors leading to American victory and British defeat; include the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown.
, SS4H4d
Describe key individuals in the American Revolution with emphasis on King George III, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Benedict Arnold, Patrick Henry, and John Adams.
· Learn Your 'ABCs' and Sign the Declaration of Independence, 21st-Century Style SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
· Clarity of Exression: Thomas Paine and 'Common Sense'



JANUARY-FEBUARY


Week 15 - The Revolutionary War
Students will study events of the American Revolution, focusing on George Washington as the commander of the Continental Army.
· Taking Fort T SS4G2d
Explain how each force (American and British) attempted to use the physical geography of each battle site to its benefit (SS4H4c).
· Military Technology of Yesterday and Today: the Turtle
· Washington’s Winning Ways SS4H4c
Describe the major events of the American Revolution and explain the factors leading to American victory and British defeat; include the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown.
, SS4H4d
Describe key individuals in the American Revolution with emphasis on King George III, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Benedict Arnold, Patrick Henry, and John Adams.
· A Brave and Honorable Woman
· American Revolution Allies SS4H2b
Describe examples of cooperation and conflict between Europeans and Native Americans.
· The Thrill of Victory, The Agony of Defeat

Week 16 - Growing Pains
Students will discuss some of the problems facing the new nation—a weak central government, Shays’ rebellion and the need for a national currency.
· Ending the Revolution, Once and for All
· Becoming an American
· Growing Pains for the New Nation SS4H5a
Identify the weaknesses of the government established by the Articles of Confederation.
, SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
· It Wasn’t All Bad
· The Father of Our Country: George Washington (1732-1799)

Week 17 - The Constitution
Students will define a constitution, understand the rights/ responsibilities of a U.S. citizen and explain our system of checks and balances.
· Things Heat up in Philadelphia SS4H5b
Identify the major leaders of the Constitutional Convention (James Madison and Benjamin Franklin) and describe the major issues they debated, including the rights of states, the Great Compromise, and slavery.
· It’s Constitution Day! Let’s Celebrate!
· The Constitution is Born! SS4H5b
Identify the major leaders of the Constitutional Convention (James Madison and Benjamin Franklin) and describe the major issues they debated, including the rights of states, the Great Compromise, and slavery.
, SS4H5c
Identify the three branches of the U. S. government as outlined by the Constitution, describe what they do, how they relate to each other (checks and balances and separation of power), and how they relate to the states.
, SS4H5d
Identify and explain the rights in the Bill of Rights, describe how the Bill of Rights places limits on the power of government, and explain the reasons for its inclusion in the Constitution in 1791.
, SS4CG1b
“We the people” from the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution as a reflection of consent of the governed or popular sovereignty.
, SS4CG1c
The federal system of government in the U.S.
, SS4CG2
The student will explain the importance of freedom of expression as guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U. S. Constitution.
, SS4CG3a
Explain the process for making and enforcing laws.
, SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.
, SS4CG3c
Describe providing for the defense of the nation.
, SS4CG3d
Explain limiting the power of people in authority.
, SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG4b
Explain the necessity of obeying reasonable laws/rules voluntarily, and explain why it is important for citizens in a democratic society to participate in public (civic) life (staying informed, voting, volunteering, communicating with public officials).
· Compromise SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· The Spinning Jenny
· How are voting rights protected by the Constitution?
· George Mason SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).

Week 18 - Plans for the New Government
Students will demonstrate their understanding of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence and will compare Federalist and Anti-Federalist views of government.
· City Mouse, Country Mouse SS4H5b
Identify the major leaders of the Constitutional Convention (James Madison and Benjamin Franklin) and describe the major issues they debated, including the rights of states, the Great Compromise, and slavery.
· Constitutional Changes and Challenges
· Plans for the New Government SS4H5b
Identify the major leaders of the Constitutional Convention (James Madison and Benjamin Franklin) and describe the major issues they debated, including the rights of states, the Great Compromise, and slavery.
, SS4H5c
Identify the three branches of the U. S. government as outlined by the Constitution, describe what they do, how they relate to each other (checks and balances and separation of power), and how they relate to the states.
, SS4H5d
Identify and explain the rights in the Bill of Rights, describe how the Bill of Rights places limits on the power of government, and explain the reasons for its inclusion in the Constitution in 1791.
, SS4CG1c
The federal system of government in the U.S.
, SS4CG3a
Explain the process for making and enforcing laws.
, SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.
, SS4CG3d
Explain limiting the power of people in authority.
, SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG4b
Explain the necessity of obeying reasonable laws/rules voluntarily, and explain why it is important for citizens in a democratic society to participate in public (civic) life (staying informed, voting, volunteering, communicating with public officials).
, SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· The Cotton Gin SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· Numismatic Mania
· Red, White, Blue ... and Yellow?

Week 19 - Government of the People
Students will explain the structure and function of government.
· Why Do We Need Government Anyway? SS4CG1c
The federal system of government in the U.S.
· Is There Too Much Money in Politics?
· Dividing the Power SS4H5c
Identify the three branches of the U. S. government as outlined by the Constitution, describe what they do, how they relate to each other (checks and balances and separation of power), and how they relate to the states.
, SS4H5d
Identify and explain the rights in the Bill of Rights, describe how the Bill of Rights places limits on the power of government, and explain the reasons for its inclusion in the Constitution in 1791.
, SS4CG1c
The federal system of government in the U.S.
, SS4CG3a
Explain the process for making and enforcing laws.
, SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.
, SS4CG3c
Describe providing for the defense of the nation.
, SS4CG3d
Explain limiting the power of people in authority.
, SS4CG3e
Explain the fiscal responsibility of government.
, SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG4b
Explain the necessity of obeying reasonable laws/rules voluntarily, and explain why it is important for citizens in a democratic society to participate in public (civic) life (staying informed, voting, volunteering, communicating with public officials).
· Respect for Human Rights SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· Unintended Effects
· What is the system of checks and balances?
· Thomas Jefferson SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).

Week 20 - Louisiana Purchase
Students will study and describe the events leading up to, during and resulting from the Louisiana Purchase.
· Have I Got a Deal for You! SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
· Paddling Across the Atlantic!
· Exploring the Louisiana Purchase SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
, SS4H6c
Describe the impact of westward expansion on Native Americans.
, SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.
, SS4G2e
Describe physical barriers that hindered and physical gateways that benefited territorial expansion from 1801 to 1861 (SS4H6a).
· Dedication
· Portable Soup
· What were the benefits of the Louisiana Purchase?
· Meriwether Lewis

Week 21 - War of 1812
Students will explain the causes/ effects of the War of 1812 and the effects of westward expansion on American Indians.
· Trail of Tears SS4H6c
Describe the impact of westward expansion on Native Americans.
· Westward Ho!
· The War of 1812 SS4H5e
Describe the causes and events of the War of 1812; include the burning of the Capitol and the White House.
, SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
, SS4H6c
Describe the impact of westward expansion on Native Americans.
· Compassion
· Old Ironsides
· What is a national anthem?
· Dolley Madison SS4H5e
Describe the causes and events of the War of 1812; include the burning of the Capitol and the White House.



MARCH-MAY


Week 22 - Early Westward Expansion
Students will recognize influential people of westward expansion and be able to describe the contributions they made.
· Fur on the Frontier SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
, SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.
· See You at the Rendezvous!
· Mountain Men, Explorers and Guides - Oh My! SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
, SS4H6c
Describe the impact of westward expansion on Native Americans.
, SS4G1a
Locate major physical features of the United States; include the Atlantic Coastal Plain, the Great Plains, the Continental Divide, the Great Basin, Death Valley, the Gulf of Mexico, the St. Lawrence River, and the Great Lakes.
, SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.
, SS4G2e
Describe physical barriers that hindered and physical gateways that benefited territorial expansion from 1801 to 1861 (SS4H6a).
· Endurance
· Bowie Knife
· What does the term 'mad as a hatter' mean?
· John Wesley Powell SS4G2b
Describe how the early explorers (SS4H2a) adapted, or failed to adapt, to the various physical environments in which they traveled.
, SS4G2e
Describe physical barriers that hindered and physical gateways that benefited territorial expansion from 1801 to 1861 (SS4H6a).

Week 23 - Westward Ho!
Students will study the westward trails through secondary and primary sources, including journal entries of children who made the journey.
· Westward Ho!
· Living Like a Pioneer
· Hitting the Trail SS4H6a
Describe territorial expansion with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Texas (the Alamo and independence), Oregon (Oregon Trail), and California (Gold Rush and the development of mining towns).
, SS4G2e
Describe physical barriers that hindered and physical gateways that benefited territorial expansion from 1801 to 1861 (SS4H6a).
· Stamina
· Roadometer SS4E1f
Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States (such as the steamboat, the steam locomotive, and the telegraph).
· How many pioneers journeyed to the West during the mid-1800s?
· Brigham Young

Week 24 - Industry vs. Agriculture
Students will examine life in the North and South in the first half of the 19th century.
· Life in the North and South: Industry vs. Agriculture
· Industry vs. Agriculture SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4E1c
Describe how specialization improves standards of living (such as the differences in the economies in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies).
· John Deere SS4E1f
Give examples of technological advancements and their impact on business productivity during the development of the United States (such as the steamboat, the steam locomotive, and the telegraph).
· Slave Families

Week 25 - Conflicts and Compromises
Students will discuss conflicts that eventually led to the Civil War, such as the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act and the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln.
· The Roots of Conflict
· Agriculture a Way of Life for Fewer in the U.S.
· Compromises and Kansas SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
· Abolitionists ‘Build’ an Underground Railroad
· 1860: The Election of Abraham Lincoln SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).

Week 26 - The Civil War
Students will discuss the secession of southern states and the beginning of the Civil War. They will study the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863.
· The Union is Dissolved
· Quilted Controversy
· The Blue and the Gray SS4CG3c
Describe providing for the defense of the nation.
, SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
· One War, Two Leaders SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· The Emancipation Proclamation
· Jefferson Davis: President of the Confederate States of America SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).

Week 27 - The War Continues
Students will continue their study of the Civil War. They will discuss some battles of the war and the role of women as nurses, seamstresses and sometimes as soldiers and spies.
· The Boy is a Soldier SS4CG3c
Describe providing for the defense of the nation.
· The Civil War in Real Time
· Behind the Lines and Back at Home SS4CG3c
Describe providing for the defense of the nation.
· Civil War Secret Agents SS4CG5
The student will name positive character traits of key historical figures and government leaders (honesty, patriotism, courage, trustworthiness).
· Women and the War SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.

Week 28 - Reconstruction
Students will examine Lincoln’s plan to reunite the North and South and read about his assassination in 1865. They will learn about the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments.
· Reconstructing a Nation SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.
· Joplin Works to Rebuild After a Deadly Tornado
· One Nation Again SS4CG3b
Explain managing conflicts and protecting rights.
, SS4CG4a
Explain the necessity of respecting the rights of others and promoting the common good.
, SS4CG4b
Explain the necessity of obeying reasonable laws/rules voluntarily, and explain why it is important for citizens in a democratic society to participate in public (civic) life (staying informed, voting, volunteering, communicating with public officials).
· Sharecropping in the South
· Hiram Revels: First African American Senator
· Carpetbaggers and Scalawags